Surgical Services

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We understand that surgery can be a source of anxiety for you and your family. That’s why it’s important to trust the people who will be taking care of your pet. Our experienced team of doctors and staff make it their number one priority to focus on pain management and patient safety. We use the most current surgical practices to ensure your pet receives the best veterinary care. Our team will be working with you throughout the surgery to address any questions or concerns you may have about the surgical procedure, anesthesia, or post-operative care. In short: we don’t cut corners, and we don’t compromise on care.

ACL or CCL Repair

ACL/CCL Repair
(A referral from your primary veterinarian is recommended but NOT required for this procedure)
One of the most common injuries to a dog’s knee is the tearing of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). This ligament is similar to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans, as such the terms ACL and CCL can be used interchangeably. In both the human and dog knee, this ligament attaches from the back of the femur and crosses through to the front of the tibia providing stability.

When the CCL is torn or injured, the shin bone (tibia) slides forward with respect to the thigh bone (femur), which is known as a positive drawer sign. Most dogs with this injury cannot walk normally and experience pain. The resulting instability damages the cartilage and surrounding bones and leads to osteoarthritis (OA). The type of surgery recommended will be dependent on your dog’s size, age, weight, activity level, and the unique circumstances of the tear. Animal Works veterinarians will guide you through the decision making process and advise you on the best surgical option for your pet.

Extracapsular Suture Repair aka: The ACL band Surgery: This is one of two methods that we offer at Animal Works; some version of this surgery has been used in the vet world since the 1960’s. This surgery intends to restore stability to the hind joint by placing sutures outside of the joint but underneath the muscles. The placement of suture mimics the normal activity of the ligament. A continuous monofilament (one fiber) nylon suture is placed around the fabella of the femur and is looped through a hole drilled into the tibial tuberosity. The two ends of the fishing line like suture are held into place by a stainless-steel clip.

This is a good choice for animals of a medium to small size and that are generally calm. The repeated stress of an active or large dog can lead to the band breaking down or loosening before the knee has healed fully, which would mean another surgery to stabilize the knee.

The recovery period for this procedure will be roughly 16 weeks of attentive care and confinement. We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care, as well as rehabilitation. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from a CCL tear is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to keeping the site clean and ensuring that your dog wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the area.

Modified Maquet Procedure (MMP)

The MMP is an evolution of the decades old TTA procedure. This is a procedure that changes the anatomy of the knee joint by cutting and moving a piece of the shin bone. In the MMP, the new position is maintained by a porous titanium wedge and staple. The large patellar tendon and thigh muscles will do the job of the ACL by preventing the femur from sliding backward. The benefit of the MMP over the previous TTA is that the process has been streamlined and the tools adapted to minimize surgical time and possible complications.

Despite the more invasive nature of the surgery, the recovery from an MMP is usually pretty quick. Dogs will typically be walking on the leg with some weight a few days after the procedure. A month or so post-op, many dogs will be putting a normal or almost normal amount of weight on the leg. Rest is still very important to the healing of the bone and rebuilding of the muscle after an ACL tear, and detailed instructions will be discussed before surgery to ensure the best outcomes for your pet.

Complications are somewhat rare, but can be more serious than those seen with the band surgery. The most extreme case would be a fracture of the shin bone. This would require a major surgery to repair and stabilize the bone while it heals. As with most complications, this is mostly preventable by following the outlined aftercare.

Anal Sacculectomy

Anal Sacculectomy is a surgical procedure that is primarily used to treat anal sac disease. The anal glands, or sacs, sit on either side of your pet’s anus. Inside each sac are sebaceous glands, responsible for secretion production. Usually, the glands empty out regularly when your pet has a bowel movement. If the oily, smelly secretion does not come out in the feces, your pet’s anal glands can become impacted. Signs of anal sac disease include “scooting,” excessive licking under the tail, tenderness near the tail or anus, and /or bloody or sticky drainage from the anal sacs. Surgical removal of the anal glands is indicated whenever the pet’s anal glands are severely infected, continuously obstructed, or a tumor develops in the gland. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from an anal sacculectomy is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to keeping the site clean and ensuring that your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the area.

Cat Bite Abscess

A bite-wound abscess usually manifests as a painful, fluid-filled lump under the skin. You may notice a scab over a puncture wound near the lump, but sometimes an abscess is not noticed until it breaks through the skin and oozes pus. This can be quite common in cats who have access to the outdoors and often develop into serious infections that require immediate veterinary care. ​ If you believe your cat has an abscess, please call our office at 970-694-2625.

Cherry Eye Repair

Cherry eye is a condition where the tear gland behind the dog’s third eyelid (the nictitating membrane) moves out of position and swells. It will have the appearance of a cherry sitting in the corner of the eye. The gland can pop out because of inflammation, allergies, infection, or having a genetic predisposition. The condition can occur in one or both eyes and occurs most frequently in young dogs under the age of two. Breeds such as English and French bulldogs, Bloodhounds, King Charles Spaniels, and Great Danes are more commonly affected.

Cherry eyes may or may not be painful for your pet; however, it can cause tear production to stop, which can cause dry eye or keratoconjunctivitis. To repair a cherry eye, we create a pocket in the third eyelid and sew the gland in place. Re-occurrence of cherry eye in dogs can happen, especially when the prolapsed gland is very big and has a history of being chronically inflamed. We do not “tack” cherry eyes at Animal Works.

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from a cherry eye surgery are just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to making sure your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent ​aggravating and scratching at the eye.

Dewclaw Removal

A dewclaw removal is comparable to a thumb on a human and classified as a vestigial digit. Most dogs will have dewclaws on the front paws, and some can be found on the rear as well. Not all dogs have dewclaws. Front dewclaw removal help dogs grasp things using their forelegs, such as a ball, toy, or food. Rear dewclaw removal in climbing breeds such as Saint Bernards, and Great Pyrenees are thought to help while climbing rough terrain. There is no valid medical reason for front dewclaw removal and even of well-developed rear dewclaw removal. Therefore, at Animal Works, we only consider surgical removal if there is a disease, injury, or a situation that makes surgery in the best interest of your pet.

Ear Hematoma

A hematoma on a dog’s ear is when blood vessels in the pinna, the floppy part of a dog’s ear, burst and bleeds into the space between the ear cartilage and skin. This is most associated with trauma such as bite wounds and shaking or scratching the ears. Dogs with ear infections may shake their head or scratch their ears, causing an aural hematoma. In some cases, there may be a piece of material lodged in the ear canal, such as a piece of grass. One of the most common signs of an ear hematoma is the appearance of your pet’s ear; it can look like it is inflated or a large bulge. A dog with an ear hematoma may hold its head sideways, scratch at its ear, and may even shake its head more often than usual.

An ear hematoma can be very painful for a dog. Not treating it promptly or treating it incorrectly can lead to a disfigurement of the dog’s ear flap and the surrounding area.

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from an aural hematoma are just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to your pet’s activity levels and ensure that your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent ​aggravating the area.

Enucleation

Enucleation is the removal of an eyeball. There are many reasons that the eye may need to be removed, such as trauma, severe ulcers, cancer, glaucoma, or diseases within the eye. When the eye is removed, the tear gland and a portion of the eyelids are removed too. The remaining skin is permanently sutured closed. Hair will regrow over the area, and usually, the skin will sink in a little, which may or may not be very noticeable depending on your pet’s coat. Despite how scary it may sound, it is a common procedure that pets adapt to very well. We have additional tips for owning a blind dog; just ask at pick up!

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. ​The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from an enucleation are just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive by carefully monitoring your pet after surgery and ensuring that your pet wears a cone around the collar to prevent rubbing or aggravating the eye.

Exploratory Surgery

Pets are curious creatures. They often put things in their mouths to carry around or just play with. Sometimes, these items end up getting swallowed. Intestinal foreign bodies or simply foreign bodies is a term that refers to any material other than food that is eaten by a pet and results in a serious digestive problem in the stomach. Foreign bodies such as, but not limited to, toys, strings, clothing, plastic, bones, rocks, and food wrappers can become lodged and create an obstruction. Any household objects your pet chews on can become a foreign body problem needing urgent veterinary attention. Intestinal blockage symptoms can be easy to brush off as merely an upset stomach unless you witness your pet swallow a foreign object. Common symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite and energy, painful abdomen to the touch, and whining. Your veterinarian will likely take an x-ray to determine if a foreign body is present and if surgery is needed. Sometimes the foreign body is obvious, but often, the foreign body itself may not be seen by the x-rays. An obstructive pattern of gas-distended intestines can imply there is something causing a blockage. When this happens, and there is not an obvious cause of obstruction on x-ray, exploratory surgery is necessary. Exploratory surgery is just as it sounds; we will need to explore things that could not be found on x-rays. Sometimes we may find that there is no foreign body but another cause of intestinal blockages such as twisted intestines or a growth. Getting to surgery as soon as possible will give your pet the best chance of survival. An intestinal blockage is an urgent, life-threatening matter!

Fracture or Broken Bone Surgery Repair
(A referral from your primary veterinarian is recommended but NOT required for this procedure)

A fracture is any break in bone or cartilage, either complete or incomplete. With any fracture, there is also damage to the pet’s surrounding soft tissues. Treatment for fractures varies widely depending upon the type and location of the fracture. Please contact us to see how we can help.

Grass Awn/Foxtail Surgical Plant Removal

One of the most common minor emergencies we see during the summer is grass awn foreign bodies. Grass awns and foxtails are bristle-like spikey grassy weed plants that can become lodged in pet ears, between toes, and under the skin. The most common presentation is between the toes. Clinical signs will be swelling, redness, and even a draining tract. Grass awns have backward-pointing barbs that prevent retrograde movement, making removal difficult, painful, and causing them to migrate deeper into the skin with just your pet’s normal motion activities. If you see your dog’s foot appearing as described, please call our office at 970-694-2625.

Laceration or Wound Repair

One of the most common surgeries performed in veterinary medicine is a laceration repair. A laceration is a wound produced by the tearing of body tissue. Bites, cuts, and punctures often cause severe damage requiring surgical treatment. Surgical repair is indicated whenever the laceration occurred recently and is large enough to warrant sutures. Wounds have many causes, sizes, and locations. They are usually treated surgically by cleaning and removing the damaged tissue, then closing the wound with sutures. In some cases, drains may be placed in wounds if there is a concern for fluid build-up under the skin. If your pet has a laceration, please give us a call immediately. For this situation, we do not require a referral or previous diagnosis from your primary vet. The longer the time between injury and repair, the more likely the tissues will become infected and healing will be delayed.

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from a laceration surgery is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to making sure your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating and licking the wound.

Patella Luxation Repair

(A referral from your primary veterinarian is recommended but NOT required for this procedure)

Patella Luxation is a displacement of the kneecap (patella). This condition occurs if the groove (the trochlea) is too shallow, and when your pet bends its knee, the patella pops out of place. The main symptom of a luxating patella is an intermittent hopping or skip on the limb when the patella pops out of place. The kneecap may dislocate toward the inside (medial) or outside (lateral) of the leg or move in both directions. Medial luxation is the more common condition that occurs mostly in small and miniature breed dogs, such as chihuahuas, Shih Tzus, Pugs, and toy poodles. When the patella is luxated out of the joint, it rides against the bone instead of in the joint groove, causing pain and eventually arthritis. It is often recommended to repair sooner than later to prevent future problems. In some cases, your pet’s knee may require bone rotation for alignment, which is medically called tibial tuberosity transposition (TTT).

Pyometra

Pyometra, or Pyo for short, is a life-threatening infection of the uterus. The uterus becomes filled with pus, and the infection can spread systemically, leading to sepsis. Pyometra occurs commonly in female pets who have not been spayed and will begin several weeks after a heat cycle. It develops due to an increase in hormonal stimulation from the uterus combined with introduced bacteria. Some symptoms of a pyometra include abnormal discharge from the vulva, lack of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy. Pyometra is a serious medical condition that requires prompt treatment. If left untreated, the uterus will rupture, and your pet will die. The treatment is to surgically remove the infected uterus and ovaries by performing an emergency ovariohysterectomy (spay). The surgery is more complicated at this stage than a regular spay. Pets diagnosed and treated in the early stage of the disease are generally good surgical candidates.

Splenectomy

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure meant to remove the spleen. Pets and people can live without a spleen. Spleens can be removed because of trauma, a mass, or torsion, which is the twisting of the blood vessels supplying the spleen. The symptoms you might see are generally vague and vary, such as decreased appetite, lethargy, swollen abdomen. Or, they just seem “not quite themselves”. It is important to see your primary vet for an accurate diagnosis, as these signs can mean any number of problems.

A splenectomy procedure may be carried out as an emergency, life-saving surgery if the pet’s spleen has already ruptured or as an “elective” surgery when the pet is stable, and your primary vet has detected the presence of suspected masses on the spleen. ​Please note: We are ​unable to perform emergency ​splenectomies.

Vaginal Prolapse

Vaginal Prolapse occurs when the tissue of the vaginal wall protrudes abnormally through the vaginal opening. The prolapsed organ may appear in the shape of a donut, and the tissue will be pink and inflamed. The condition is mostly seen in young female dogs who have not yet been spayed and usually occurs right before or during the dog’s heat cycle. Dogs suffering vaginal prolapse may lick frequently at the genital area and experience pain or discomfort with urination. We require a surgical spay for your pet in this matter to bring her out of heat faster so the swelling will diminish and not recur.

Amputations

Amputation is the removal of a pet’s limb. It’s only done in extreme cases, such as the limb is damaged beyond repair, if the pet has cancer, or a birth defect creating an unusable limb. Following amputation, it will take some time for your pet to heal and adjust, but generally, amputation offers quick pain relief and a short healing time. Fortunately, animals are not like humans and do not experience the same psychological effects as people following amputation. All sizes of pets can recover well and go on to live a happy life after having a limb amputated. If your pet is overweight, weight loss will help reduce the strain on the remaining joints that now support your pet. Of course, a lean body condition is healthier for your pet, regardless of how many legs they have.

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care as well as rehabilitation. ​The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from an amputation is just as important as the surgery, ​and you as the owner will need to be attentive to keeping the site clean, as well as ensuring that your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the area.

Blocked Cat/Urethral Obstruction

A blocked cat describes a feline that cannot pass urine due to an obstruction in the urethra. It is one of the true emergencies affecting cats and can quickly become life-threatening.​ ​If your cat is having difficulty urinating, do not delay. Please call our office now at 970-694-2625. If it is after hours, you must take your cat to an emergency clinic.

Treating a blocked cat involves emptying the bladder, relieving the urethral blockage, and dealing with the developed biochemical abnormalities. This is typically done by placing a catheter through the urethra and leaving it in place until the bladder has had a chance to remain empty and recover. Blocked cats may stay hospitalized at our clinic for 4-7 days.

Cesarean-Section Surgery

C-section is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when a pet is having difficulty with natural birthing. There are many reasons that female pets require a C-section, ranging from a narrow birth canal to an awkward positioning of the litter. If you believe your pet needs an emergency C-section, please call our office at 970-694-2625. Please note: We may not be able to accommodate due to the amount of staffing and resources this surgery requires. We only accept emergency C-sections; spaying is required for us to perform this surgery.

Cystotomy or Bladder Stone Surgery

Bladder Stones are rock-like formations of minerals that develop in the urinary bladder. In pets, they are commonly caused by chronic low-grade urinary tract infections and/or the way your pet metabolizes the mineral contents of food and water. The most common signs that a pet has bladder stones would be blood in urine and straining to urinate. Blood in the urine occurs because the stones rub against the bladder wall, irritating and damaging the tissue and causing bleeding. Straining to urinate may result from inflammation and swelling of the bladder wall and urethra (the tube that transports the urine from the bladder to the exterior of the body), muscle spasms, or physical obstruction of urine flow. Bladder stones are commonly most detected by x-rays, or if there are many, your primary vet may find them by palpating the bladder with their hands. Surgical removal of bladder stones is often the quickest way of taking care of your pet. Once the bladder stones have been accessed and removed, we will send the stones out to our lab to be analyzed for their composition. Your pet will need to be on a special diet based on the results of the stones from the lab.

We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. ​The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from Bladder Stone Surgery is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to keep your pet on the recommended diet and keeping the incision site clean and dry, as well as ensuring that your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the area. ​These stones will recur if you do not take preventative measures after surgery. It is highly recommended to make a follow-up appointment with your primary veterinarian to create and implement a preventive plan to decrease the chance of bladder infection.

Dental Cleaning with Extractions

Maintaining the health of your pet’s teeth is the most important thing you can do to increase the comfort and length of your pet’s life. Care and treatment of your pet’s teeth and gums are extremely important for overall health. Your pet’s teeth should be professionally cleaned, scaled, and polished regularly throughout your pet’s lifetime to help assure they keep their teeth for as long as possible, control breath odor, and help prevent liver, kidney, or heart disease from developing.

Dental X-Rays

Taking dental radiographs is the only way to know the true health and stability of your pet’s teeth. Radiographs are beneficial in allowing us to visualize the parts of your pet’s teeth underneath the gum line, where a large percentage of your pet’s structures lie. Being able to see this allows a better assessment of the overall oral health of your pet. Some of the conditions radiographs enable us to assess include bone loss, cyst or tumors, and signs of trouble such as fractured roots.

Entropion & Ectropion

Entropion and ectropion are both conditions that affect a dog’s eyelids. Dogs with entropion have eyelids that roll inward, whereas dogs with ectropion have eyelids that roll outward. Both eyelid changes can be problematic for the cornea, causing changes from minor irritation up to severe corneal ulcerations. These eye conditions are strongly linked to genetic factors, and some breeds are predisposed.

With both entropion and ectropion, you may notice that your dog’s eyes appear red and irritated. Other symptoms with both can include squinting, watery eyes, conjunctivitis, and pain, which will result in your dog rubbing at their eyes with their paws. Prior to and after surgery, eye medications such as antibiotics and lubricants may be used to help treat secondary problems that have developed. In some cases, we may need two separate surgeries; a primary, major surgical correction, then a minor corrective surgery later to prevent overcorrection.

Surgical correction with most cases is successful; however, if the condition is severe, it may be necessary for us to refer you to a veterinarian ophthalmologist. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from either of these surgeries is just as important as the surgery. You will need to be carefully monitoring your pet after surgery and ensuring that your pet wears a cone around the collar to prevent rubbing or aggravating the eyes.

Epulis Removal

Dental epulis is the most common benign oral mass found in dogs. They typically appear as a small, pinkish protrusion from the gums. These occur most commonly in brachycephalic breeds (those with short noses, like Boxers and Bulldogs). Removal of the complete tumor is often difficult, and even removing the adjacent teeth is sometimes not enough to prevent these from regrowing. Our veterinarian will discuss removal options, regrowth chances, and address any other concerns during the pre-surgical consult.

In most cases, we would recommend scheduling a dental cleaning at the same time we remove the epulis. After surgical removal, it is not uncommon for your dog to experience blood-tinged saliva for the first 24-48 hours. We will recommend feeding soft food only for 2-3 weeks to ensure that the healing process is not disrupted.

FHNE & FHO

(A referral from your primary veterinarian is recommended but NOT required for this procedure)

Dogs and cats can develop hip pain from hip dysplasia, injury, dislocation, or severe arthritis. FHO is the surgical removal of part of the hip joint, which aims to eliminate the pain that is caused by abnormal contact of the bones. FHO surgery may be a good option for your pet if hip pain is impeding function or quality of life. Your vet, or even a physical therapist, may be needed to determine where the pain is coming from, and if surgery is indicated.

In this procedure, the head and neck of the femur (the long leg bone or thighbone) are removed. The surrounding muscles, connective tissue, and scar tissue will continue to hold the leg in place, creating a false joint. The procedure causes the leg to be slightly shorter than the unaffected leg, although amazingly, most pets return close to normal activity shortly after surgery.

Dogs weighing less than 50 pounds and cats who are at a healthy weight are good candidates for an FHO surgery. The false joint can more easily support the weight of smaller pets than large or overweight pets. However, there are exceptions, and an FHO may be recommended even for a dog over 50 pounds if the specifics of the case dictate that doing so would be appropriate. We will provide you with a detailed instruction form for post-operative care, as well as rehabilitation. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovery are just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to restricting your pet’s activity level and ensuring that your pet wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the surgical incision area.

Gastropexy

A gastropexy or stomach tack is a surgical procedure performed in large breed dogs to prevent gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV), also known as bloat. This is suggested to be performed early in life (usually at the same time as a spay/ neuter. Most often referred to as “bloat,” GDV occurs when a dog’s stomach fills up with gas and twists, cutting off blood and oxygen to the stomach. In a gastropexy, our veterinarians will surgically ‘tack’ the stomach to the right side of the body wall. This will hold the stomach in place, preventing it from making the twist that results in GDV. Please note that your dog could still bloat after a gastropexy is done. The tacking of the stomach stops the dangerous part of bloat, which is the twisting of the stomach. Your pet’s stomach can still fill up with air or food and bloat, but if the tacking holds, the stomach will not twist. This gives you more time to get your dog in for treatment without the stomach twisting.

Hernias

A hernia occurs when an organ pushes through an opening in the muscle or tissue that holds it in place. One will most likely notice a bulge or lump in the affected area. They are most commonly located at the umbilicus (belly button area), inguinal (groin area), perineal (next to rectum area), or in the diaphragm (the muscle between the chest and the abdomen). They can be congenital (present from birth) or traumatic (caused by trauma). The type of hernia will depend on treatment; most hernias are surgically repaired by replacing the tissue where it belongs and closing the hole in the muscle. We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. ​The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from a hernia repair is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive by carefully monitoring your pet after surgery and ensuring that your pet wears a cone around the collar to prevent rubbing or aggravating the area.

Lump, Mass or Tumor Removal

At some point, most owners will find unusual lumps and bumps on their pets’ bodies, especially as they get older. Lumps, masses, or tumors are basically abnormal growths that can appear on or just under the skin. They can appear anywhere on the body and grow in different cell types. Some are slow-growing, and some can grow rather quickly. We see many types of tumors or masses in dogs and cats. A small sample taken with a needle can help tell the type of growth and if removal is indicated. This will be done by your primary veterinarian.

Lump removals are intended to remove dangerous or unwanted growths from your pet. The goal is to remove abnormal tissue so it cannot cause problems either by growing too large, damaging surrounding tissue, or spreading to other places inside the body. Please note the recurrence of certain tumors is possible despite appropriate surgical removal. We often recommend sending the removed tissue to our lab so a histopathologist can review and determine if any other action needs to be taken. We can have the lab results sent to your primary veterinarian (with your permission) for review and additional follow up care to help prevent recurrence or spread of the tumor.

Perineal Urethrostomy

Perineal Urethrostomy, commonly referred to as a “PU,” is a surgical procedure that is most commonly done on male cats with a urinary obstruction that cannot be corrected by catheterization or repetitive blockages have occurred. In this procedure, we make a new opening in the urethra (the tube that transports urine from the bladder out the body), allowing easier urination with a lower risk of a reoccurring obstruction. The word perineal refers to the location of the new hole between the penis and the anus; the term urethrostomy is the process of surgically making the new hole. Less commonly, perineal urethrostomy may also be performed in cats with severe urethral trauma. A urinary blockage is one of the true emergencies affecting cats and can quickly become life-threatening. It is important to repeat that the PU surgery significantly lowers the chance of repeat blockages but does not guarantee a future blockage will not occur. Post-operative preventative care is very important to the success of this surgery.

Rectal Prolapse

This condition occurs when tissue protrudes abnormally through the anus. The prolapsed organ may appear in the shape of a donut, and the tissue will be pink and inflamed. This should be treated as an emergency situation and requires immediate veterinary care. If you believe your pet has a prolapsed rectum, call our office at 970-694-2625.

Tibial Tuberosity Transposition (TTT)
(A referral from your primary veterinarian is recommended but NOT required for this procedure)

A tibial tuberosity transposition is a procedure to help correct severe cases of a luxating patella. In this procedure, the tibial tuberosity, which anchors the patellar tendon, is cut off the rest of the tibia (shin bone) and pinned back in a new location. This helps reduce the abnormal forces that lead to the patella luxating in the first place. This surgery is almost always done in tandem with the more common techniques of deepening the patellar groove and tightening the joint capsule. Because we have made and pinned a fracture, we will need to monitor the bone healing over the course of the next 10-16 weeks. This requires recheck appointments at our clinic. The recovery period for this procedure will be roughly 16 weeks of attentive care and confinement. We will provide you with detailed instructions for post-operative care. The post-operative care and monitoring component of recovering from a TTT surgery is just as important as the surgery. As the owner, you will need to be attentive to keeping the site clean and ensuring that your dog wears a cone around its collar to prevent aggravating the area.

Vulvoplasty

Vulvoplasty or Episioplasty ​is ​a reconstructive ​surgical procedure meant to remove the excess skin folds around the vagina. In a dog with a recessed vulva, folds of skin hang over the vulva. These skin folds often trap urine and debris, leading to a warm, moist environment allowing bacteria to reproduce rapidly. Removing this excess skin through surgery allows air to circulate and keeps urine and debris from getting trapped between the skin folds. ​The symptoms you might ​notice include scooting, licking private areas more often, odor, frequent urination, and urinary accidents, as well as recurring urinary tract infections. ​It is important to see your primary vet for an accurate diagnosis, as these signs can mean any number of problems.​ The goal is to have a more comfortable and happier pet after a vulvoplasty surgery.

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